Library Loot // May 19, 2021

Within a week of the end of my Spring semester I had nearly an unreasonable amount of materials checked out from the library. A large portion, however, were cookbooks or gardening books which I flipped through and soon returned (or at least set in a pile to return a few at a time, so as not to overwhelm our aides who will have to re-shelve everything!). Now I am mostly down to a reasonable amount. It’s still probably more than I will get through before Summer classes start (June 1), but I would rather have more options at my fingertips than run out of books to read (the horror!).

Library Loot is a weekly event co-hosted by Claire from The Captive Reader and Sharlene from Real Life Reading that encourages bloggers to share the books they’ve checked out from the library. If you’d like to participate, just write up your post and link it using the Mr. Linky any time during the week.

Books

*(not in the order pictured)

  1. America’s Greatest Library: An Illustrated History of the Library of Congress by John Y. Cole
    • Nonfiction – American History, Library of Congress, Photography
    • Packed with fascinating facts, compelling images, and little-known nuggets of information, this new go-to illustrated guide to the history of the Library of Congress will appeal to history buffs and general readers alike. It distils 242 years of history into an engaging read that makes a Washington icon relevant today.
  2. How to Give Up Plastic: A Guide to Changing the World, One Plastic Bottle at a Time by Will McCallum
    • Nonfiction – Environmentalism
    • This accessible guide, written by the campaigner at the forefront of the anti-plastic movement, will help you make the small changes that make a big difference, from buying a reusable coffee cup to running a clean-up at your local park or beach.
  3. The Librarian of Boone’s Hollow by Kim Vogel Sawyer
    • Historical Fiction – Great Depression-era Kentucky
    • “During the Great Depression, Addie Cowherd dreams of being a novelist and offering readers the escape that books gave her during her tragic childhood. When her adoptive father loses his job, she is forced to leave college and take the only employment she can find–delivering books on horseback to poor coal mining families in the hills of Kentucky … Inspired by the real WPA program that sent librarians on horseback to deliver books to hill families in Kentucky, Kim Vogel Sawyer immersed herself in Appalachian history to tell this captivating story.”
  4. The Blue Castle by L.M. Montgomery
    • Historical Fiction; lesser-known classic
    • “Valancy Stirling is 29, unmarried, and has never been in love. Living with her overbearing mother and meddlesome aunt, she finds her only consolation in the “forbidden” books of John Foster and her daydreams of the Blue Castle–a place where all her dreams come true and she can be who she truly wants to be. After getting shocking news from the doctor, she rebels against her family and discovers a surprising new world, full of love and adventures far beyond her most secret dreams.”
  5. Collecting Shakespeare: the Story of Henry & Emily Folger by Stephen H. Grant
    • Nonfiction – Biography, American History
    • Shortly after marrying in 1885, the Folgers started buying, cataloging, and storing all manner of items about Shakespeare and his era. Emily earned a master’s degree in Shakespeare studies. The frugal couple worked passionately as a tight-knit team during the Gilded Age, financing their hobby with the fortune Henry earned as president of Standard Oil Company of New York, where he was a trusted associate of John D. Rockefeller Sr.
  6. How Not to Kill Your Houseplant: Survival Tips for the Horticulturally Challenged by Veronica Peerless
    • Nonfiction, Horticulture
    • “Help your plant live with survival tips and learn the simple ways not to kill your plants.With over 50 different types of popular houseplants, How Not to Kill Your Houseplant summarizes what type of care your plants do (or don’t) need. Be on the lookout for warning signs of a sick plant, from brown spots to crispy leaves, and make sure you take the proper action to rescue your plant.
  7. Go Green, Save Green: A Simple Guide to Saving Time, Money, & God’s Green Earth by Nancy Sleeth
    • Nonfiction – Environmentalism
    • “Many people want to “go green” but put it off because they believe it’s too time consuming and too expensive. Not so! Nancy Sleeth and her family have been living an eco-friendly lifestyle for years saving both time and money. Now, for the first time, she divulges hundreds of practical, easy-to-implement steps that you can take to create substantial money savings while protecting the earth. Sleeth also demonstrates how going green helps people live more God-centered lives by becoming better stewards of financial and natural resources.
  8. Hope in Times of Fear: The Resurrection and the Meaning of Easter by Timothy Keller
    • Nonfiction – Theology
    • Hope in the Time of Fear is a book that unlocks the meaning of Jesus’s resurrection for readers. Easter is considered the most solemn and important holiday for Christians. It is a time of spiritual rebirth and a time of celebrating the physical rebirth of Jesus after three days in the tomb. For his devoted followers, nothing could prepare them for the moment they met the resurrected Jesus. Each failed to recognize him. All of them physically saw him and yet did not spiritually truly see him. It was only when Jesus reached out and invited them to see who he truly was that their eyes were open. Here the central message of the Christian faith is revealed in a way only Timothy Keller could do it–filled with unshakable belief, piercing insight, and a profound new way to look at a story you think you know. After reading this book, the true meaning of Easter will no longer be unseen.”
  9. Howl’s Moving Castle by Diana Wynne Jones
    • Young Adult Fantasy
    • Sophie has the great misfortune of being the eldest of three daughters, destined to fail miserably should she ever leave home to seek her fate. But when she unwittingly attracts the ire of the Witch of the Waste, Sophie finds herself under a horrid spell that transforms her into an old lady. Her only chance at breaking it lies in the ever-moving castle in the hills: the Wizard Howl’s castle. To untangle the enchantment, Sophie must handle the heartless Howl, strike a bargain with a fire demon, and meet the Witch of the Waste head-on. Along the way, she discovers that there’s far more to Howl—and herself—than first meets the eye.
  10. 5 Ingredients 15 Minutes, Simple, Fast Delicious Recipes by Good Housekeeping
    • Nonfiction – Cookbook
    • Take 5 . . . ingredients! That, and a mere 15 minutes of cooking, is all you need to put a delicious dinner on the table every night. From Chicken on the Double and Speedy Seafood to Pasta Presto and Quick-Fix Desserts, these fail-safe recipes from your favorite magazines make cooking for your family super easy. Enjoy Pizza Pronto, Tandoori Chicken Skewers, Gaucho Steak with Grilled Peppers, Beer-Braised Pork Chops, and Provençale Arctic Char—along with a host of speedy salads (Arugula and Olive, for example) and sides (like the Ultimate Mashed Potatoes). Finish off with Chocolate-Hazelnut Panini and Grilled Peach Melba for a satisfying ending that will make everyone happy. Plus, you’ll get tips on planning, shopping, and organizing your kitchen to shave even MORE cooking time from your schedule.
  11. The New Shade Garden by Ken Druse
    • Nonfiction – Gardening
    • “There is a new generation of gardeners who are planting gardens not only for their visual beauty but also for their ability to reduce carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. In The New Shade Garden, Ken Druse provides this generation with a comprehensive guide to creating a shade garden with an emphasis on the adjustments necessary for our changing climate. Druse offers advice for common problems facing today’s gardeners, from addressing the deer situation to watering plants without stressing limited resources. Detailing all aspects of the gardening process, the book covers basic topics such as designing your own garden, pruning trees, preparing soil for planting, and the vast array of flowers and greenery that grow best in the shade. Perfect for new and seasoned gardeners alike, this wide-ranging encyclopedic manual provides all the information you need to start or improve upon your own shade garden.”
  12. Fresh Food From Small Spaces: the Square-Inch Gardener’s Guide by R. J. Ruppenthal
    • Nonfiction – Gardening
    • “Readers will learn how to transform their balconies and windowsills into productive vegetable gardens, their countertops and storage lockers into commercial-quality sprout and mushroom farms, and their outside nooks and crannies into whatever they can imagine, including sustainable nurseries for honeybees and chickens. Free space for the city gardener might be no more than a cramped patio, balcony, rooftop, windowsill, hanging rafter, dark cabinet, garage, or storage area, but no space is too small or too dark to raise food. With this book as a guide, people living in apartments, condominiums, townhouses, and single-family homes will be able to grow up to 20 percent of their own fresh food using a combination of traditional gardening methods and space-saving techniques such as reflected lighting and container “terracing.” Those with access to yards can produce even more.

DVDs

Andrew Carnegie: Rags to Riches, Power to Peace Poster
  1. Andrew Carnegie: Rags to Riches, Power to Peace (2015) (link goes to IMDB)
    • “Andrew Carnegie: Rags to Riches, Power to Peace charts the story of a poor Scottish immigrant who became the richest man in the world. We examine how Carnegie’s steel empire changed America, and his forgotten attempt to bring about peace in the run up to the First World War. Narrated by Brian Cox.”
  2. Carousel (1956) (links to IMDB)
    • Fifteen years after his death, a carousel barker is granted permission to return to Earth for one day to make amends to his widow and their daughter.
  3. To Walk Invisible: The Bronte Sisters (2016) (links to IMDB)
    • “A chronicle of the Brontë sisters’ battle to overcome obstacles and publish their novels, which would become some of the greatest in the English language.”

I missed having time to read during this semester, so I’m soaking up as much as I can in these weeks between semesters! Also, I took the picture yesterday and then returned few of the books to the library later in the day, so that is why there are a few in the picture which are not described below.

What do you have planned for the summer, Reader? Do any of your plans include reading or participating in reading/library challenges? I’d love to hear about whatever you have going on!

Until the next chapter,

Jana

5 thoughts on “Library Loot // May 19, 2021

Add yours

  1. Sounds like you have a lot ahead of you before summer semester begins! I hope you get to enjoy all that you picked out…or least get to look at them a bit more!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. At this point my hope is to read one more fiction and two more nonfiction books before classes start. I think it’s doable! If nothing else I’m surrounded by interesting things lol.

      Like

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