Tackling the TBR #19

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Explanation: It has become apparent that my TBR (to be read) list has gotten nearly out of hand. Therefore, I have decided to do a post featuring ten books from it approximately every other week. As I go through the list, I will evaluate each book and decide whether or not it still belongs. Who knows, perhaps as my list (hopefully) shrinks, you will find a few books to add to your own!filligree page divider

The last time I did this type of post was February 22. At the end of that post, my TBR list contained 766 books. Today it has 793. I have gone through 210 books.

New York#211.  New York by Edward Rutherfurd

Synopsis: Edward Rutherfurd celebrates America’s greatest city in a rich, engrossing saga, weaving together tales of families rich and poor, native-born and immigrant—a cast of fictional and true characters whose fates rise and fall and rise again with the city’s fortunes. From this intimate perspective we see New York’s humble beginnings as a tiny Indian fishing village, the arrival of Dutch and British merchants, the Revolutionary War, the emergence of the city as a great trading and financial center, the convulsions of the Civil War, the excesses of the Gilded Age, the explosion of immigration in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, the trials of World War II, the near demise of New York in the 1970s and its roaring rebirth in the 1990s, and the attack on the World Trade Center. A stirring mix of battle, romance, family struggles, and personal triumphs, New York: The Novel gloriously captures the search for freedom and opportunity at the heart of our nation’s history.

Comments: This isn’t a high priority, but it still sounds interesting. I’ll leave it as a long-term TBR.

Decision: Keep

Paris#212.  Paris by Edward Rutherfurd

Synopsis: From Edward Rutherfurd, the grand master of the historical novel, comes a dazzling epic about the magnificent city of Paris. Moving back and forth in time, the story unfolds through intimate and thrilling tales of self-discovery, divided loyalty, and long-kept secrets. As various characters come of age, seek their fortunes, and fall in and out of love, the novel follows nobles who claim descent from the hero of the celebrated poem The Song of Roland; a humble family that embodies the ideals of the French Revolution; a pair of brothers from the slums behind Montmartre, one of whom works on the Eiffel Tower as the other joins the underworld near the Moulin Rouge; and merchants who lose everything during the reign of Louis XV, rise again in the age of Napoleon, and help establish Paris as the great center of art and culture that it is today. With Rutherfurd’s unrivaled blend of impeccable research and narrative verve, this bold novel brings the sights, scents, and tastes of the City of Light to brilliant life.

Comments: Same as above. Eventually I might like to read this, so it can stay on my list.

Decision: Keep

Ben-Hur: A Tale of the Christ#213.  Ben-Hur by Lew Wallace

Synopsis: Ben-Hur: A Tale of the Christ (1880) by Lew Wallace is one of the most popular and beloved 19th century American novels. This faithful New Testament tale combines the events of the life of Jesus with grand historical spectacle in the exciting story of Judah of the House of Hur, a man who finds extraordinary redemption for himself and his family.A classic of faith, fortitude, and inspiration.

Comments: I know, I should’ve already read this by now, but somehow I haven’t.

Decision: Keep

The Heavens Before (Genesis, #1)#214. The Heavens Before by Kacy Barnett-Gramckow

Synopsis: Marginalized by society and mistreated by her own family, Annah befriends a young man she’s never seen before. Shem is captivated by Annah’s courage, and he risks everything to help her gain her freedom. Trusting in the Most High, Annah marries Shem and joins her strange new family in their solitary faith that will ultimately separate them from an ancient world of amazing beauty and appalling violence–a world fast approaching the unimaginable catastrophe of the Great Flood. Out of this chaos, only eight people will survive. Their world is our world. Their future is our own.

Comments: Meh, this could be good, but with over 750 books on my to-read list, I don’t think it’s worth hanging onto this one.

Decision: Remove 

The Diary of a Bookseller#215.  The Diary of a Bookseller by Shaun Bythell

Synopsis: Shaun Bythell owns The Bookshop, Wigtown – Scotland’s largest second-hand bookshop. It contains 100,000 books, spread over a mile of shelving, with twisting corridors and roaring fires, and all set in a beautiful, rural town by the edge of the sea. A book-lover’s paradise? Well, almost…In these wry and hilarious diaries, Shaun provides an inside look at the trials and tribulations of life in the book trade, from struggles with eccentric customers to wrangles with his own staff, who include the ski-suit-wearing, bin-foraging Nicky. He takes us with him on buying trips to old estates and auction houses, recommends books (both lost classics and new discoveries), introduces us to the thrill of the unexpected find, and evokes the rhythms and charms of small-town life, always with a sharp and sympathetic eye. 

Comments: This book sounds like a lot of fun, especially in the context of the Rare Books class I’m currently taking!

Decision: Keep

The Little Paris Bookshop#216.  The Little Paris Bookshop by Nina George

Synopsis: Monsieur Perdu calls himself a literary apothecary. From his floating bookstore in a barge on the Seine, he prescribes novels for the hardships of life. Using his intuitive feel for the exact book a reader needs, Perdu mends broken hearts and souls. The only person he can’t seem to heal through literature is himself; he’s still haunted by heartbreak after his great love disappeared. She left him with only a letter, which he has never opened.

After Perdu is finally tempted to read the letter, he hauls anchor and departs on a mission to the south of France, hoping to make peace with his loss and discover the end of the story. Joined by a bestselling but blocked author and a lovelorn Italian chef, Perdu travels along the country’s rivers, dispensing his wisdom and his books, showing that the literary world can take the human soul on a journey to heal itself.

Comments: This book sounds amazing!

Decision: Keep

One Day in December#217.  One Day in December by Josie Silver

Synopsis: Two people. Ten chances. One unforgettable love story.

Laurie is pretty sure love at first sight doesn’t exist anywhere but the movies. But then, through a misted-up bus window one snowy December day, she sees a man who she knows instantly is the one. Their eyes meet, there’s a moment of pure magic… and then her bus drives away. Certain they’re fated to find each other again, Laurie spends a year scanning every bus stop and café in London for him. But she doesn’t find him, not when it matters anyway. Instead they “reunite” at a Christmas party, when her best friend Sarah giddily introduces her new boyfriend to Laurie. It’s Jack, the man from the bus. It would be.

What follows for Laurie, Sarah and Jack is ten years of friendship, heartbreak, missed opportunities, roads not taken, and destinies reconsidered. One Day in December is a joyous, heartwarming and immensely moving love story to escape into and a reminder that fate takes inexplicable turns along the route to happiness.

Comments: No thanks.

Decision: Remove

The Wartime Sisters#218.  The Wartime Sisters by Linda Cohen Loigman

Synopsis: Two estranged sisters, raised in Brooklyn and each burdened with her own shocking secret, are reunited at the Springfield Armory in the early days of WWII. While one sister lives in relative ease on the bucolic Armory campus as an officer’s wife, the other arrives as a war widow and takes a position in the Armory factories as a “soldier of production.” Resentment festers between the two, and secrets are shattered when a mysterious figure from the past reemerges in their lives.

Comments: Probably something I would have enjoyed once upon a time, but not anymore.

Decision: Remove

The Best of Intentions (Canadian Crossings, #1)#219.  The Best of Intentions by Susan Anne Mason

Synopsis: In the aftermath of tragedy, Grace hopes to reclaim her nephew from the relatives who rejected her sister because of her class. Under an alias, she becomes her nephew’s nanny to observe the formidable family up close. Unexpectedly, she begins to fall for the boy’s guardian, who is promised to another. Can Grace protect her nephew . . . and her heart?

Comments: Not my cup of tea these days.

Decision: Remove

White Wolf and the Ash Princess (The White Wolf Series Book One)#220.  White Wolf and the Ash Princess by Tammy Lash

Synopsis: Memory loss prohibits Izzy from remembering her life before age seven when she suffered a terrible trauma that left her with physical scars. Crippling panic keeps Izzy from wandering beyond the stables but Tubs, the Gudwyne’s young stable boy, encourages Izzy to go beyond the property’s rock wall into a world that promises possible answers but also great danger.

A mysterious cellar filled with secrets sets Izzy on a path to the New World where the Wendigo wanders and Water Panther swims. In the wilds of seventeenth-century America, Izzy and Jonathan discover the legends of the New World aren’t the fairytales of their library home in England.

Comments: Again, pass.

Decision: Remove

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Ending number of books on TBR list: 788

Have you read any of these books? What would you decide?

Until the next chapter,

Jana

6 thoughts on “Tackling the TBR #19

Add yours

  1. I have read the first on your list- New York. I found it fascinating- well written and interesting. I agree with your keep and remove decisions. Is Ben Hur the book, the same as the film of that name? I shall have to find out.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I believe Ben Hur is the same as the film, but I have not seen the movie or read the book. Someday I need to do both! And that is good to hear about New York. I’m a little intimidated by its length, but I hope to eventually read it.

      Like

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